Some 15 to 20 million people have been arrested on drug charges and subjected to the tender mercies of the criminal justice system in the past two decades. But, thanks to congressional drug warriors, the punishments drug offenders face often extend far beyond the prison walls or the parole officer’s office. A number of federal laws ostensibly aimed at reducing drug use block people with drug convictions from gaining access to federal benefits and services. These laws have a disproportionate impact on society’s most vulnerable or marginalized members — the poor, people of color, and women with children — and in some cases, do not even require that a person actually be convicted of a drug offense to be punished.

A growing number of groups and individuals ranging from the American Bar Association to welfare rights organizations, public health and addiction groups, drug reform organizations, and elected officials have called for changes in these laws or their outright repeal, saying they are cruel, inhumane, counterproductive, and amount to “double jeopardy” for drug offenders trying to become productive members of society.

“We feel that these laws are discriminatory and tend to focus on an illness as opposed to a crime,” said Alexa Eggleston of the Legal Action Center, one of the key groups in the movement to adjust those laws. “We also think that if you have a conviction, you should be able to serve your time and come out and resume your life. We say we want people to get sober, get treatment, get a job, get housing, but then we set up all these barriers and roadblocks that seem designed to stop them from moving forward. These lifetime bans are very destructive of people’s ability to reintegrate into society and move forward with their lives as productive citizens.”

RESOURCE

http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2007/feb/04/feature_conviction_keeps_hurting

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